THE TROLL MOTHER
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italdred:

Alhambra Window Screen b (by Art is life playing to other rhythms)
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dicktofen:

I commissioned Avali to draw Richtofen and it is the bEST FUCKING THING EVER AAAAAAHHHHH
*HEAVY METAL SCREAMING*
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femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
Christ Embracing Saint Bernard, a circa 1626 painting by Francisco Ribalta, reveals pretty much immediately by its stark Tenebrist chiaroscuro that (as the National Gallery very mildly puts it) “Ribalta’s later paintings show knowledge of Caravaggio.”
The comparison, then, is undeniable.
I suppose the place I draw the strongest contrast between the two, though, is also the most effective—or one might say, affective—part of this painting.
Caravaggio is not what I would call a master of emotions. Take the Entombment of Christ—everyone looks bored, uncomfortable, or both.
Yet by eliminating “any detail that might distract the viewer,” as the Museo Nacional del Prado writes, Ribalta can focus on the beautiful poignancy of the moment: what the Getty calls his “deeply felt spiritual beliefs” are almost palpable.
Indeed, the pair in this painting exude a breathtaking sense of love—which is only emphasized by the rivulets of watery blood running down Christ’s shoulders and side (and even over Saint Bernard’s forehead).
That fallen droplet underlines the sense of remarkable physicality the work possesses—this is not an impersonal or abstracted God, but a viscerally, stunningly corporeal one.
alwaysignorantofeverything:

BEST
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